Auditions

 

Exit Laughing
Written by Paul Elliott
Directed by Michael J. Frohnhoefer

Performances: February 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 2019

Auditions: Sunday, November 18 and Monday, November 19, 2018 (at 7PM)

When the biggest highlight in your life has been your weekly bridge night with the “girls”, what do you do when one of your foursome inconveniently dies? If you’re Connie, Leona and Millie, three southern ladies from Birmingham, you “borrow” the ashes from the funeral home for one last card game and the resulting wild, exciting night involves a police raid, a stripper and a whole new way of looking at all the fun you can have when you’re truly living.

“The Golden Girls meets Steel Magnolias” ~ Jay Handelman, Sarasota Herald Tribune

Sponsored by Swartz Architecture, Inc & Lawrence J. Paggi PC

Rachel Ann Harland (20’s) – A little uptight, high strung.  A young woman who seems to have issues with life and men until bridge night opens her eyes

Connie Harland (50’s – 60’s) – Responsible, strong and stable. Mother of Rachel, who finds on this fateful bridge night that life doesn’t end at after 50.

Leona (50’s – 60’s) – Fun and quick witted. One of Connie’s closest friends and a member of the bridge club for over 30 years. A woman who’s a beautician by profession and a rather caustic lush by preference.

Millie (50’s – 60’s) – Innocent and good natured. Another of Connie’s friends and a long-standing member of the bridge club. This is a woman who moves to her own special drummer, even though she’s the only one who can hear him.

Bobby / Policeman(20’s) – Intelligent, good looking and must be comfortable performing a strip tease.

All interested actors should prepare a 1 to 2-minute monologue, either dramatic or comedic.


The Drowsy Chaperone
Book by Bob Martin and Don McKellar
Music and lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison
Directed by Jeff Wilson

Performances: May 3, 4, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 2019

Auditions: Sunday, January 20 and Monday, January 21, 2019 (at 7PM)

A parody of American musical comedy of the 1920s. As the recording of the (fictional) 1928 hit The Drowsy Chaperone plays, the show comes to life onstage. It’s all there: Mistaken identities, dream sequences, an unflappable English butler, an absent-minded dowager, a Broadway impresario, comic gangsters, a ditzy chorine, a harried best man, and a “Drowsy” (i.e. “tipsy”) Chaperone, played in the show-within-a-show by a blowzy Grande Dame of the Stage. The Drowsy Chaperone is a masterful meta-musical, poking fun at the musical theatre genre.

“The Perfect Broadway Musical” ~ New York Magazine